Professional Training Program

The Professional Training Program has three levels of certification: InstructorAssociateMaster Teacher. The following lists the requirements to achieve Certification as a teacher of the Taubman Approach.


Prerequisite for admission to the Professional Training Program:

  • 30 to 60 hours of private study with a Golandsky Institute faculty member and this teacher's recommendation. 
  • Supervised lessons with at least two students who demonstrate an understanding of basic Taubman principles. A potential candidate’s supervising teacher must have seen enough examples of teaching to support admission to the program. Candidates for certification will then be enrolled in the program by their supervising teacher.

Certification at the Instructor level requires:

Private Study

  • 40 – 80 additional hours of private study and/or the recommendation of the private teacher.
  • Understanding of the fundamentals of the Taubman Approach and their implementation in music from the beginner through the intermediate levels of repertoire.

Supervised Teaching

  • 40 units of supervised teaching and/or the recommendation of the private teacher. (Note: For supervised teaching, one unit of study is equal to 30 minutes. Practice Assistance will be considered as part of this requirement if they are assisting their own students under the supervision of a faculty member.)
  • Three students who show solid understanding of the skills necessary to play correctly five fingers and a scale using the Taubman Approach.
  • Three students who demonstrate the fundamentals of the Taubman Approach in level-appropriate repertoire.

Workshops

  • 55 units Golandsky Institute participation to include: 2 Summer Institutes @ 15 units each, 3 Teacher Trainings @ 5 units each and 1 other Workshop @ 10 units. (Note: A minimum level of participation is expected. Failure to participate in any one category for 6 months could result in suspension from the program.)

Prerequisites to the Associate program: 

  • Certification at the Instructor level
  • Teacher recommendation

Certification at the Associate level requires:

Private Study

  • 120 additional hours of private study and/or the recommendation of the private teacher
  • The ability to demonstrate all the elements of the Taubman Approach in combination and to solve passage-specific problems.

Supervised Teaching

  • 40 additional units of supervised teaching and/or the recommendation of the private teacher.
  • Three students who demonstrate solid understanding of the skills necessary to play scales, arpeggios, octaves, chords, trills and tremolo.
  • Three students who perform all the elements of the Taubman Approach in combination and are able to solve passage-specific problems. (Further clarification: the students must have the fundamental technique working well and are dealing with passage related challenges.)
  • Three students who integrate the Taubman Approach in 2 works of the late intermediate to early advanced repertoire and demonstrate a high level of musicianship skills.
  • Theoretical Knowledge (To be determined by the Certification Committee. ( Edna Golandsky, John Bloomfield, Robert Durso, Mary Moran)

Workshops

  • 95 additional units of the Golandsky Institute participation to include: 3 Summer Institutes, 6 Teacher Trainings and 2 other Workshops.

Performance

  • A performance for the Certification Committee of solo repertoire. (A live or unedited video performance will be accepted.)
  • Note: A minimum level of participation is expected. Failure to participate in any one category for 6 months could result in suspension from the program.

Prerequisites to the Master Teacher program: 

  • Certification at the Associate level
  • Teacher recommendation

Certification at the Master Teacher level requires:

Private Study

  • 150 additional hours of private study and/or recommendation by the Board.
  • Playing ability at the advanced level.
  • Demonstration of ability to: use principles of the Taubman Approach; solve passage problems; master the components of musical artistry, such as: phrasing, musical timing and tone etc.
  • 2 lessons per year with Edna Golandsky.

Supervised Teaching

  • 2 supervised teachings per year with Edna Golandsky.
  • Three students who have mastered the fundamentals of the Taubman Approach and are able to solve a majority of passage-related problems.
  • Three students who perform a piece from the advanced repertoire at the level of a public performance for the Certification Committee. A live or video performance will be accepted.

Theoretical Knowledge

  • To be determined by the Certification Committee.

Workshops

  • Regular attendance at Summer Institutes, Teacher Trainings and other Workshops.

Performance

  • A performance for the Certification Committee of solo repertoire. ( A live or unedited video performance will be accepted.)

Interview

  • A Final Interview by the Board.
  • Approval of the Board.

Note: A minimum level of participation is expected. Failure to participate in any one category for 6 months could result in suspension from the program.

 


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FAQ

What is the difference between Golandsky Institute faculty and Golandsky Institute certified teachers?

Certification levels and faculty are two different tracks. From time to time they can intersect. We cannot automatically make all certified teachers faculty members. To use the analogy of a college or university that graduates students but does not place them as faculty members, so de we operate.

What is the relationship between Master Teacher level and associate faculty?

Someone can be at the Master Teacher level of certification and on the associate faculty. To use the analogy of a school's faculty, one can be a DMA and be an assistant, associate or full professor.

What is the relationship between Master Teacher level certification and faculty?

All Golandsky Institute faculty have reached the Master Teacher level, but not all Master Teachers are faculty.

“Impressive results with the Taubman approach in relieving and preventing injuries and also facilitating greater accomplishment at the piano appears to me to be a gross understatement.”

Leo Gorelkin, M.D.