Testimonials

Antonin Boinay

First of all, I would like to thank Edna for her kindness and her support during the year I spent in New York (from 2014 to 2015).  I would also like the thank her for her deep understanding of the Taubman work and her capacity to guide me through the learning process.

My name is Antonin, I'm 25 years old and I'm from a small town in the french part of Switzerland called La Chaux-de-Fonds.  I began to play the piano at the age of 5.  In 2009, right after high school, I decided that I wanted...


Art Bailey

Dear Edna,

I can’t thank you enough for your patience and guidance, and for this incredible work you’ve developed.  Without any exaggeration, your work has saved my career.  There are few things in this world I love more than making music on the piano, and just before finding out about you, I had resigned myself to giving it up and finding something else to do with my life.  It’s an invaluable gift to know that I can continue playing.  Thank you.

Art Bailey jazz pianist<...


Brenda Hunting

I met Therese Milanovic at the first MTAQ workshop she presented on the Taubman Approach five and half years ago. After living with pain and limitation for thirty years due to playing related injuries sustained during tertiary music studies (impacting everyday life and severely limiting my ability to play), I was excited by the glimmer of hope that her workshop offered me. When I embarked upon lessons with Therese soon after that workshop, I had no idea how dramatic the changes would be. Retraining my technique was challenging and at times confronting, but also exciting as each new breakthrough...


Adeline Ee

Being small-built with hands that just about reach an octave, I used to believe that diligent practice would make up for my physical limitations at the keyboard. My teachers in music school concluded that I had weak fingers and poor technique; my arms and body mass were too slight, my bone structure too fine. Virtuosic repertoire, double octaves and big chords were to be avoided at the risk of injury.

So I practiced technical and finger exercises, stretched my hands daily, and continued to labor away at the keyboard. All I got for my efforts was pain:...


Jeremy Chan

My name is Jeremy Chan and I'm from Sydney, Australia.  I started playing the piano when I was 5 and decided to pursue a Bachelor of Music in piano performance at University of South Wales after finishing high school. Prior to this I had won piano competitions, performed on national radio, and had performed all over Australia.

As I was practicing for more competitions, there was a passage in a Stravinsky etude that I found particularly awkward, and I would often feel tired after practicing it.  The feeling of tiredness did not go away, and...


Hélène Marchand

Val-d’Or, Québec, Canada May 3, 2010 Greetings Ms. Golandsky  I wish to tell you how thrilled we were about the workshop given by Mrs. Mariko Sato at the Val-d’Or Music Conservatory last january, 2010.  I am a piano-accompanist at the music conservatory and 5 years ago, I developed tendonitis in both my forearms. The pain worsened from week to week, and I feared that this condition was the result of my work as an accompanist. I love my work and I couldn’t imagine a situation where I’d no longer be able...


Laura Lucas

Father Sean [Duggan]: I am so grateful that I was able to study with you these past two years. Thank you for your patience, kindness, and understanding. I have grown so much as a pianist and musician. I truly believe God brought me to your studio and allowed me to study Taubman, the adaptation that enabled me to play this recital. I am confident that if it was not for learning the Taubman technique I would not be playing. Thank you for that gift! I look forward to using its insights when teaching students and clients in the future.<...


Dr. Therese Milanovic

My story is a fortunate one.  Upon commencing my undergraduate studies, I was very inspired to improve and to work hard.  With an important exam looming, I increased my practice from two to seven or eight hours a day.  Unaware of the existence of playing-related injury or the severity of the consequences, I played for the exam in pain and was diagnosed later with tendonitis in my right thumb.  Six weeks of no practice seemed like an eternity.  A cortisone injection was presented as the only option, and after the injection I went back...


Charlotte Williams

(From the East Cobber Magazine, Marietta, Georgia)

Starting Over

In 1996, at age 40, pianist/composer Charlotte Williams was faced with two options: she could continue to play piano professionally and endure the ever-increasing pain of tendinitis and carpal tunnel syndrome, or she could set out to find a new career. With over 34 years invested in the study of piano, however, neither option seemed quite right.   “I had reached a real crisis point,” explained Ms. Williams, “because I was literally in pain 24 hours a day.” One evening, during a performance at...


Diego Taccuso

Dear Professor Golandsky:

You don’t know me, but since I bought the complete video series of The Taubman Techniques a few years ago and watched them hundreds of time, I “know you” very well.

You and Dorothy Taubman are very important figures in my life, even if I’ve never met you. Without any doubt you are the best teachers I’ve ever had.

Don’t worry: I’m not going to tell everybody that “I studied” with you (I wish I had)....


Maureen Volk, DMA

I’ve been on the piano faculty at Memorial University of Newfoundland since 1979. In 1990 I hurt my right hand, an injury that caused almost constant pain in my hand, arm, elbow, shoulders and back. The injury occurred away from the piano, but in retrospect I suspect that it was made possible by years of misuse at the piano. Most everyday activities became difficult and painful, including washing dishes, ironing, carrying and lifting, turning a key in a lock, etc. I was unable to play the piano at all for over a year. Even the oom-pah-pah teacher accompaniments in...


Ron Stabinsky

My earliest technical training was in the tradition of the finger independence and stretching exercises that are far too familiar to most pianists. However, I eventually studied with a teacher who encouraged a technique that resulted in less stress to the body. This approach involved much relaxation and was a welcome change from the finger isolation of my earlier playing. For a number of years, I believed that this relaxed approach would prevent future injury and satisfy my needs as a pianist.

Unfortunately, as years passed I became less satisfied with my tone production. My sound often...