Testimonials

Aaron Berkowitz, M.D., Ph.D

When musicians are injured, they are often offered strategies for recovery that include physical therapy, treatment of pain, and reduction in continuous time practicing.  While these approaches can aid in recovery from injury, they do not address the root causes of musicians' injuries: deep-seated technical and postural habits that lead to maladaptive playing patterns that can cause muscular strain or neurological injury. The Taubman approach is a comprehensive method that precisely addresses these root causes of injury, leading not only to recovery, but to prevention of further injury.  The student eliminates old 'bad habits' through a practical...


Renna Whittredge Pye, M.D.

I went to Edna in September of 2010 at the suggestion of an old friend who is a Juilliard faculty member. The previous summer I had attempted to prepare two movements of a Brahms trio to participate in Apple Hill summer chamber music workshop, and I had run into difficulty with forearm pain. My friend insisted that if I wanted to progress to this level of playing and learn to play well without injuries, I really needed to go see Edna. She immediately put me at ease and gave me very specific guidance which transformed my playing over the course...


Stanley G. Rockson, M.D.

It’s difficult to overemphasize the joy that I have experienced in discovering the Golandsky Institute after more than 50 years of serious dedication to the piano. At long last, through the Taubman Approach, I have found the ideal means to near-effortless, directed physical mastery of keyboard technique. Each time that I watch the Taubman Technique videos I discover yet another nuance of this very elegant approach to the correct application of technique to physical and musical performance! In 2008, I had the first opportunity to attend The Golandsky Institute Summer Symposium at Princeton, where these core principles were introduced...


Jerry Titel, M.D.

I am a physician anesthesiologist and have been practicing medicine for nearly thirty years. I have been interested in the piano since early childhood. At my mother’s insistence, I began piano lessons around the age of five. I studied the piano through high school and into my first years of college, but I gave it up because of other academic interests and a lack of time. Years later I tried to get back into it, but despite my efforts, my playing did not improve. I heard about Taubman’s approach to the piano, and found a...


Dr. William A. Pereira

The following is an excerpt from a federally funded study performed by Dr. William A. Pereira in 1995:

Biomechanical Differences in Playing Styles Among Pianists at the Dorothy Taubman Institute of Piano

Cumulative trauma disorders are the number one specific occupational health and safety problem in the United States, according to National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). The incidence of occupational CTD's has reached epidemic proportions, currently accounting for over 60% of all reported industrial injuries. CTD's affect workers in a broad range of industries, affecting unskilled laborers and highly-trained professionals alike.

...

Leo Gorelkin, M.D.

To Whom It May Concern:

My wife Paula, a classically trained pianist, playing the piano for 53 years, had received cortisone shots about three years ago and eventually surgery on both hands for three fingers from very painful and incapacitating injuries (trigger fingers) which apparently resulted from her playing. After the surgery, yet another finger was threatening. At that time she met a teacher at the Golandsky Institute who suggested she be evaluated by Edna Golandsky herself, a major proponent and master teacher of the Taubman approach. She professed that Edna might be helpful with her problem. What...


Karin Boisvert, M.D.

I am a family doctor in practice in Joliet, a small town near Montreal. I have been playing the piano since the age of five. At the time of writing, I am 28 years old. I participated in piano competitions, but had to stop taking lessons when I entered medical school, although I have continued to play. I started taking lessons again two years ago; I have had more time to play since being in private practice as a doctor.

When I resumed lessons, it was with my childhood teacher. Since the last time I had taken lessons...


H. Franklin Bunn, M.D.

To Whom It May Concern:

I am a physician at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, specializing in diseases of the blood. I am also a keen amateur pianist and study at the School of Continuing Education at the New England Conservatory of Music (NEC). For 5 years I was a member of the Board of Overseers of the NEC. At present I am on the NEC Board of Visitors.

… Because of my other life as an amateur pianist, I am eager for opportunities to learn and improve my playing. More...